On Big Drawings

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Sea Level, 2005, Suyama Space, Seattle, WA
1,700 fine gauge wires stretched parallel to the gallery floor at varying heights, forming a three-dimensional plane, measuring 24'x17'x4", that floated just above the surface. Reflected light travels along the wires, vanishing and reappearing with the shifting natural conditions of the space and the position of the viewer.
 
 
'String Installation', dimensions and context variable, plastic or wire filament
Originally from Chicago, Christine Wallers has lived, exhibited and curated shows in Seattle, New Mexico, France and Germany. Her work references an interest in natural phenomena, most notably light and water phenomena in the
Northwest, the Southwest and the Midwest. She is a cross-disciplinary artist whose work uses formal procedures of minimal and post-minimal art to craft installations that are site-specific, experientially-based and often fleeting. Within this
she attempts to create an experience of the ephemeral, the just emerging and the barely visible from the interplay between object and space. Time and its shifts are key to understanding her process. Her work has been reviewed in Art in
America, TimeOut Chicago, and featured in Dwell magazine. In addition, she has been a visiting artist at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, TX.
 

Christine Wallers in her Chicago studio, summer 2013

Her recent two-dimensional works (the black piece, the white piece, Self Portrait: Summer 2014) explore the sculptural aspect of drawing:

“The ghosting, the scaring, the cuts- finding so many layers of skin on a flat sheet of paper. The work feels like it is aging.”

“There is a cut that feels like I’m letting something in- letting light in- and a cut that feels like bursting out. This tactile difference is important. “

“I love the tension created by the cut outs being too close together because they overlap and rip- there is a feeling of pulling away. It causes a tenuousness on the surface that I really like.”


CHRISTINE WALLERS



BIOGRAPHY

Originally from Chicago, Christine Wallers has lived, exhibited and curated shows in Seattle, New Mexico, France and Germany. Her work references an interest in natural phenomena, most notably light and water phenomena in the Northwest, the Southwest and the Midwest. She is a cross-disciplinary artist whose work uses formal procedures of minimal and post-minimal art to craft installations that are site-specific, experientially-based and often fleeting. Within this she attempts to create an experience of the ephemeral, the just emerging and the barely visible from the interplay between object and space. Time and its shifts are key to understanding her process. Her work has been reviewed in Art in America, TimeOut Chicago, and featured in Dwell magazine. In addition, she has been a visiting artist at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, TX.


On Wallers’ work:

The physicality necessary to generate her work becomes an essential element of the piece. During the creation of the black piece Wallers carved the page while in a prostrate position on the floor- hovering her face and body inches from the page. There is a cultural, psychological and physical association related to such a posture yet not visible in the finished work. Instead, the piece has become imbued with the emotional tone generated from the intention and execution of the process.

The depth of her work is revealed as the viewer moves through space. The work is designed to change when seen from different locations -uncovering layers previously unseen and illuminating subtle details. This is true with all of Wallers’ work- drawings and installations.

Wallers values objects made by hand and the evidence of a trace of hand. She strives to capture what is impermanent.


Tattoo Heart, Ink, 2011-present, Chicago, IL graphite on japanese sumi ink paper, 13 x 10 in.


Sea Level, 2005, Suyama Space, Seattle, WA

1,700 fine gauge wires stretched parallel to the gallery floor at varying heights, forming a three-dimensional plane, measuring 24'x17'x4", that floated just above the surface. Reflected light travels along the wires, vanishing and reappearing with the shifting natural conditions of the space and the position of the viewer.